Ambrose Bierce
Conspiracies, The Unexplained, writer

Ambrose Bierce and the Crystal Skull

Ambrose Bierce
Ambrose Bierce with a not-crystal skull

Ambrose Bierce was an American short story writer and journalist at the turn of the century. According to Times Magazine, he’s most famous for his short story, “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”.  His book “The Devil’s Dictionary” was dubbed one of the “100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature”.  He was said to have had a “morbid fascination with horror and death”. (Who here can relate?) (Time Magazine). A civil war veteran, Ambrose Bierce accomplished a lot in his 71 + years of life.  But it’s his disappearance and presumed death that has had everyone speculating and theorizing over the last hundred years.

Continue reading “Ambrose Bierce and the Crystal Skull”

Advertisements
Picture of books on Hammett & Hellman
ghosts, writer

They left their hearts in San Francisco: The Ghost Stories of Dashiell Hammett and Lillian Hellman

Tony Bennett once sang “I left my heart in San Francisco”.  It looks like he wasn’t the only one…

Dashiell Hammett, author of noir classics such as The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, was an infamous womanizer during the prohibition era. It wasn’t long before he set his sights on Lillian Hellman, a lively fledgling playwright with great talent and feminine wiles.  The two had an on-again, off-again relationship that spanned over three decades.

The Thin Man movie image
The cast of “The Thin Man”. Hammett loosely based the character of Nora Charles on Hellman.

The accounts about the nature of Lillian and Dash’s relationship vary greatly. Some sources say that they were “friends with benefits”, which was rather progressive for the time (Vercillo, 2007).  Neither Dash nor Lillian wanted to be tied down, and they enjoyed their time together, but were never in a committed relationship.  Other sources say that their relationship was volatile, filled with passion and, sometimes, violence.  Dash couldn’t stay faithful, which led Lillian to cheat out of vengeance.  It is entirely possible that these accounts are false, and that Lillian was painted this way because the thought of a liberated woman was, at the time, unpalatable.  Lillian was said to proposition men half her age, but these stories aren’t told in the same way that they would be were it a man to have been the one doing the wooing.  It’s a double standard, but it reveals how history is shaped by those who tell it.  A dual biography written by Joan Hellen paints the lovers as anything but idyllic.  Dash might have even been violent towards Lillian.  While I haven’t had the chance to read the entirety of this book, it has a tabloid-like feel to it, and it can be difficult to determine just how much is based in fact, and how much true. Especially when both parties involved are now dead.

Continue reading “They left their hearts in San Francisco: The Ghost Stories of Dashiell Hammett and Lillian Hellman”

Image of a train
The Unexplained, writer

The Case of the Missing Mystery Author: How Agatha Christie Disappeared for 11 Days

Image of Agatha Christie
Agatha Christie 1890-1976

Everyone has heard of Agatha Christie.  She wrote during the golden age of detective fiction, and she’s been crowned as the Queen of the Cozy Mystery.  She’s written at least 74 books, including “Murder on the Orient Express”, “And then there were none”, and “Death on the Nile”.  But there’s one mystery that she didn’t write.  Instead, she lived it.  

On December 3, 1926, Agatha Christie went into her seven-year-old daughter Rosalind’s bedroom in their home in Berkshire, England, and she kissed her on the cheek goodnight.  Then, she got into her car and drove away.  She wouldn’t be discovered for another ten days.  Not only did she go missing for ten days, but when she was found, she claimed to have absolutely no memory of where she’d been or what she’d done.  

Continue reading “The Case of the Missing Mystery Author: How Agatha Christie Disappeared for 11 Days”